Soft skills:

 

Congratulations Alto, Downtown Rotana, and NCS on completing the soft skills communication programme successfully this month. Developing skills that include: non-verbal communication, negotiation, customer service, and report writing, is a key factor to ensure better performance and more satisfactory outcome on both professional and personal level.


 

Pink October:

 

Having been amongst the first to contribute in sponsoring Think Pink Bahrain, Berlitz continues to support the noble cause by raising awareness through social media #howfarforpink, as well as within the premises this year. The center, decked out in pink ribbons, carries on the mission throughout the designated month.  

 

 

Soft skills:

 

Congratulations Alto, Downtown Rotana, and NCS on completing the soft skills communication programme successfully this month. Developing skills that include: non-verbal communication, negotiation, customer service, and report writing, is a key factor to ensure better performance and more satisfactory outcome on both professional and personal level.


 

Pink October:

 

Having been amongst the first to contribute in sponsoring Think Pink Bahrain, Berlitz continues to support the noble cause by raising awareness through social media #howfarforpink, as well as within the premises this year. The center, decked out in pink ribbons, carries on the mission throughout the designated month.  


 

Was JFK really a Jelly Donut?

 

Ich Bin Ein Berliner - JFK

 

Most of us have heard the urban legend that occured on a chilly foggy day in West Berlin back in 1963. Then President of The United States John F. Kennedy approaches a podium and

proclaims himself a true Berliner, as a stance of solidarity.

 

Or did he?

 

The controversy that surrounds this moment in history is almost as much as the missile crisis and has since become legendary. Rather than getting hung up in the folly like everyone else, let's cut the crust and get straight to the facts of the language, so we can wrap our dough around this fruit flavored mess.

 

1. The Doughnut

 

Now it is true a "Berliner" was in fact what people in Germany at the time referred to as what we would more commonly call a Jelly Doughnut, but that term  was only really used elsewhere

in the country, not in Berlin, we it was called a “Pfannkuchen” . This begs the question of whether most in attendance that day would have actually gotten the pun that ha since kicked off

this whole mess to begin with.

 

2. The "Ein" in Einstein

 

Funny thing with the translation, this whole issue could have been avoided had the “ein” in “Ich bin ein Berliner” been left out. Without the nefarious “ein” the sentence would have directly translated to “I am a citizen of Berlin”, but left in the meaning changed to “I am a Berliner”.

 

The Verdict, well it seems that JFK did in fact call himself a Jelly Doughnut. The lesson here, direct translation are no substitute for learning a language itself.

 

Was JFK really a Jelly Donut?

 

Ich Bin Ein Berliner - JFK

 

Most of us have heard the urban legend that occured on a chilly foggy day in West Berlin back in 1963. Then President of The United States John F. Kennedy approaches a podium and

proclaims himself a true Berliner, as a stance of solidarity.

 

Or did he?

 

The controversy that surrounds this moment in history is almost as much as the missile crisis and has since become legendary. Rather than getting hung up in the folly like everyone else, let's cut the crust and get straight to the facts of the language, so we can wrap our dough around this fruit flavored mess.

 

1. The Doughnut

 

Now it is true a "Berliner" was in fact what people in Germany at the time referred to as what we would more commonly call a Jelly Doughnut, but that term  was only really used elsewhere

in the country, not in Berlin, we it was called a “Pfannkuchen” . This begs the question of whether most in attendance that day would have actually gotten the pun that ha since kicked off

this whole mess to begin with.

 

2. The "Ein" in Einstein

 

Funny thing with the translation, this whole issue could have been avoided had the “ein” in “Ich bin ein Berliner” been left out. Without the nefarious “ein” the sentence would have directly translated to “I am a citizen of Berlin”, but left in the meaning changed to “I am a Berliner”.

 

The Verdict, well it seems that JFK did in fact call himself a Jelly Doughnut. The lesson here, direct translation are no substitute for learning a language itself.